High School vs Associate Degree earnings
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Information provided by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) with Support from the National Postsecondary Education Cooperative (NPEC).

Hawai‘i's Summary

  • Hawaii students pay less for postsecondary education than the U.S. average in all sectors.
  • After attaining their degrees, the increase in earnings (over a high school diploma) for associate degree-earners is above the U.S. average but less than the average of the top ten states. The increase for bachelor’s degree-earners is less than the U.S. average and the average of the top ten states.
  • With the exception of young residents (ages 22 to 29) with high school diplomas, long-term Hawaii residents earn more on average than those who recently moved in from out-of-state – at the high school, associate, and bachelor’s levels.
  • Hawaii’s investment in postsecondary education relative to its population 18 to 44 with a high school diploma or some college but no degree (the majority of residents ready to enter postsecondary education or complete degrees) is above the U.S. average but less than the average of the top ten states.
  • Relative to the same population, Hawaii’s postsecondary education system awards more associate degrees than the U.S. average but fewer than the average of the top ten states. It awards fewer certificates and diplomas, and bachelor’s degrees than the U.S. average and the average of the top ten states.
  • Hawaii experiences a net-loss of residents with associate degrees and a small net-gain of residents with bachelor’s degrees and graduate/professional degrees.

 

 

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